artist projects, curated walks, PUBLIC talks,  readings, DIALOGUEs, video shorts and films

“Walking has something that animates and enlivens my ideas: I almost cannot think when I stay in place; my body must be in motion to set my mind in motion.”
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau, "Confessions"

There is a tradition in literature that connects walking and thinking, walking and coming to language. In the late 1700s, Rousseau wrote Reveries of a Solitary Walker; and in his book from that same time, Confessions, he notes "Walking has something that animates and enlivens my ideas: I almost cannot think when I stay in place; my body must be in motion to set my mind in motion.” William Wordsworth believed writing a bodily labor, and composed poems while walking to the rhythm of iambic pentameter. In the 1860s, Charles Baudelaire brought us the notion of the flâneur, the artist-poet wanderer of urban spaces, and Virginia Woolf wrote "Street Haunting" in 1930. Ossip Mandelstam composed and memorized his work while pacing about his room.

In the visual arts, too, we may track a history of walking as creative provocation, practice and product. André Breton and Tristan Tzara, created their Excursions & Visites Dada in the 1920s. In the 1950s, Guy Debord and the Situationist International, developed the dérive of psychogeography, a method of unplanned wandering to discover the qualities of place and encounter new experience. Fluxus artist, Stanley Brouwn is know for his records of walking, and the 1960s and 70s also brought such artists as Richard Long and Hamish Fulton to the attention of the art world. Other artists who create walks include Janet Cardiff, Ernesto Pujol, Sophie Calle, and Francis Alÿs.  

PLATFORM PROJECTS/WALKS explores these histories while learning from contemporary makers and thinkers.